Still decelerating on a year over year basis:
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United States Consumer Credit Change
Consumer credit in the United States increased by $18.56 billion in May 2016 following a downwardly revised $13.4 billion rise in April and above market expectations of a $16 billion gain.

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This was decelerating and below stall speed when the boom in oil capex reversed that trend early in 2014. Then in late 2014 oil capex collapsed and bank lending growth reversed and resumed its deceleration:

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And rising delinquency necessarily leads to restrictive tighter standards which slows spending growth, which causes further delinquency, until the curve ‘goes vertical’:

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